AASC

Office: (276) 964-4915
Toll-Free: (800) 656-2272
Fax: (276) 963-0130
Email: cpatton@aasc.org

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RFP - Proposal For Auditing Services


Appalachian Agency for Senior Citizens is requesting sealed proposals to establish a contract through competitive negotiation for the purchase of independent Auditing services.

All inquiries should be directed in writing via email in MS Word format to bbeck@aasc.org. Deadline for submitting written inquiries is 11:00am May 12, 2017. Proposals will be accepted until 4:00pm local time on May 17, 2017. For more information click here.


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COMBINED NOTICE OF FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT AND INTENT TO REQUEST RELEASE OF FUNDS


This Notice shall satisfy the above-cited two separate but related procedural notification requirements.

REQUEST FOR RELEASE OF FUNDS

On or about Friday, April 28, 2017 Tazewell County will submit a request to the Virginia Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) for the release of Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds under [Title/Section (1)] of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 as amended, to undertake a project known as Falls Mills Adult Daycare Project, for the purpose of providing adult daycare services in the Falls Mills area of Tazewell County.

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT

Tazewell County has determined that the project will have no significant impact on the human environment. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) is not required. Additional project information is contained in the Environmental Review Record (ERR) on file at the Tazewell County Board of Supervisors Office at 108 East Main Street, Tazewell, VA 24651 and may be examined or copied weekdays 9 A.M. to 5pm P.M.

PUBLIC COMMENTS

Any individual, group, or agency disagreeing with this determination or wishing to comment on the project may submit written comments to the Tazewell County. All comments received by Friday, April 28, 2017 will be considered by the Tazewell County prior to authorizing submission of a request for release of funds. Commentors should specify which part of this Notice they are addressing.

RELEASE OF FUNDS

Tazewell County certifies to DHCD that Patricia Green in her capacity as County Administrator consents to accept the jurisdiction of the Federal Courts if an action is brought to enforce responsibilities in relation to the environmental review process and that these responsibilities have been satisfied. DHCD’S approval of the certification satisfies its responsibilities under NEPA and related laws and authorities, and allows Tazewell County to use Program funds.

OBJECTIONS TO RELEASE OF FUNDS

DHCD will consider objections to its release of funds and Tazewell County’s certification received by Monday, May 15, 2017 or a period of fifteen days from its receipt of the request (whichever is later) only if they are on one of the following bases: (a) the certification was not executed by the Certifying Officer or other officer of Tazewell County approved by DHCD; (b) Tazewell County has omitted a step or failed to make a decision or finding required by HUD regulations at 24 CFR Part 58; (c) the grant recipient or other participants in the project have committed funds or incurred costs not authorized by 24 CFR Part 58 before approval of a release of funds by DHCD; or (d) another Federal agency acting pursuant to 40 CFR Part 1504 has submitted a written finding that the project is unsatisfactory from the standpoint of environmental quality. Objections must be prepared and submitted in accordance with the required procedures (24 CFR Part 58) and shall be addressed to DHCD at:
Director
Virginia Department of Housing And Community Development
Attn: Program Administration and Assistance Office
Main Street Centre
600 E. Main St., Suite 300
Richmond, Virginia 23219 2430
(804) 371-7061 [TTP 371-7089 / FAX 371-7093]

Potential objectors should contact DHCD to verify the actual last day of the objection period.

Patricia Green-Tazewell County Administrator
108 East Main Street
Tazewell, VA 24651-1026
276-385-1202

THE COMBINED NOTICE (FONSI/NOI-RROF) MUST BE DISTRIBUTED TO:

Barbara Rudnick, PG
NEPA Team Leader
US EPA Region III (3EA30)
1650 Arch Street, Phila, PA 19103
(215) 814-3322/ Fax: (215) 814-2783
Rudnick.Barbara@epamail.epa.gov


Department of Environmental Quality
Division of Environmental Enhancement
629 East Main Street, 6th Floor
Richmond, VA 23219
(804) 698-4330


Director
Virginia Department of Housing And Community Development
Attn: Program Administration and Assistance Office
600 East Main Street, Suite 300
Richmond, VA 23219-1321
(804) 371-7061 [Virginia Relay Center 771 / FAX 371-7093]


Local Regional and Tribal Agencies adjacent to or surrounding the jurisdiction issuing the NOI-RROF.

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Meals On Wheels Is Working For Everyone


On behalf of a network of some 5,000 local, community-based Meals on Wheels programs, we are extraordinarily heartened by the outpouring of support from the public and media over the merits of Meals on Wheels and the impact that budget cuts of any kind would have on our programs’ ability to provide nutritious meals, friendly visits and safety checks to our nation’s most vulnerable seniors. For more than four decades, Meals on Wheels programs in communities large and small, urban and rural, have worked tirelessly under the radar, trying to stretch already inadequate funds far enough to support older adults in the greatest social and economic need, enabling them to live out their lives healthier, and more safely and independently in their own homes — where they want to be.

As this week marks the 45th Anniversary of President Nixon’s signing of the legislation that created the Meals on Wheels infrastructure, we should all be celebrating its impact and finding ways to invest in it further because it is in fact working successfully for everyone:

It’s working for 2.4 million seniors. Meals on Wheels is their lifeline and often the only companionship or nutritious meal they have in a given day. Far more vulnerable than comparably-aged Americans, a typical Meals on Wheels client is a single 75 year-old woman, living alone with limited or no mobility, suffering with multiple chronic diseases, reliant on several medications daily and in need of our help.

A typical Meals on Wheels client is a single 75 year-old woman, living alone with limited or no mobility, suffering with multiple chronic diseases, reliant on several medications daily and in need of our help.

It’s working for Congress and the Administration. Meals on Wheels is one of the best examples of a successful public-private partnership as it leverages about $3 in individual, corporate, foundation, business, state and local contributions for every $1 in federal funding, and the able help of some two million volunteers, two-thirds of whom are 55 and older. As Speaker Paul Ryan wrote in his War on Poverty Report in 2014, this is one program that is targeting precisely those for whom it was intended.

It’s working for taxpayers. Meals on Wheels saves significant money by enabling seniors to remain at home longer, averting more expensive healthcare expenses incurred through Medicare and Medicaid. By preventing and expediting recovery from illness, injury and surgery, Meals on Wheels reduces unnecessary visits to the Emergency Room, admissions and readmissions to hospitals, and premature placement in nursing homes.

A study conducted for Meals on Wheels America by Brown University showed that seniors receiving Meals on Wheels reported fewer hospitalizations, improved health, less loneliness and fewer falls, which cost our country $31 billion annually. In a separate study, Brown University showed that for every $25 more per senior a state pays for Meals on Wheels, the low-care nursing home population could be reduced by 1%, saving additional millions of dollars in Medicaid savings alone, by enabling seniors to live in their own homes.

Meals on Wheels can provide a whole range of services to a senior for an entire year for roughly the same cost as one day in the hospital or 10 in a nursing home. We all win.

It’s working for the public. Meals on Wheels is a home-grown and economic solution that helps ensure that no senior is left behind, hungry or alone. It enables us to assure that our aging and vulnerable neighbors and loved ones are being looked after in a caring and compassionate manner.

And yet, while successful and well-leveraged, we are not doing enough. The need is far greater than what we are able to do with the funding that is currently available. Not only are we serving 23 million fewer meals today than we did in 2005, but that gap is widening. Waiting lists exist in every state while the senior population continues to explode.

As the country looks for ways to reduce the debt – to do more with less – we ought to be investing in those programs that are in fact proven and effective in doing so. Meals on Wheels can provide a whole range of services to a senior for an entire year for roughly the same cost as one day in the hospital or 10 in a nursing home. We all win.

Please join us on behalf of the seniors in your community and across the country to take action now. Speak up, volunteer, or give what you can. Seniors need us and we need you.


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